Welcome to the Commotion

The Phoenix Commotion is a local building initiative created to prove that constructing homes with recycled and salvaged materials has a viable place in the building industry. This process uses only apprentice labor and teaches marketable skills to anyone with a work ethic who is willing to swing a hammer. By keeping labor costs low and using donated or found materials, the homes created are truly affordable. No two are alike due to the myriad of materials used, so there is an artistic element that makes Phoenix Commotion homes unique. We target single parents, artists, and families with low incomes. We require the homeowner to be involved with the planning and construction of his or her own home. The result is a person who is empowered, not only by the useful knowledge of building skills, but by the opportunity to become part of a community as a vested participant.

crew

Dan Phillips and the Phoenix Commotion crew celebrate WM's grand opening. Waste Management of Houston, Texas--an international solid waste logistics company--commissioned Dan Phillips and crew to design the interior of a recycling education center in their new facility. Check out the coverage in the Houston Chronicle and the Huntsville Item as well as photos.

Congratulations go to Sheila Blake, Code Administrator for the City of Houston Public Works and Engineering Department, and Amanda Tullos, AIA, LEED AP, and Director of the Houston office of Green Building Services, and, of course, the Houston City Council for having the foresight to adopt such a far-reaching document. Many people worked very hard to achieve "Appendix R," and most certainly the appendix can be a model of how large metropolitan areas can respond to the social issues of affordable housing and overburdened landfills.

 Every town, city, and metropolitan area in the nation has a procedure--adopted by that municipality--to ensure that new construction is done in such a way that the public health and safety are protected. Typically, this is done through the adoption of a building code, which specifies a minimum standard of protection for all construction. However, some cities go a bit beyond the adopted code and disallow some materials and procedures they deem not allowable for any number of reasons. Recycled materials usually fall into this category, since "used" materials are not consistent in quality, and could create a problem with a unified inspection strategy which would overwhelm the system.

"Appendix R," however, adopted by the City of Houston, is a guideline for designers, builders, engineers, architects, and ultimately city inspectors. It lists the kinds of "used" materials that will be allowed, predicated on considerable analysis and research. This way everyone is on the same page, and there is a unified strategy for inspecting these materials to ensure the public health and safety.

Read Appendix R...

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resurrecting trashm

 

 

Check out our progress...

T. J. Burdett & Sons

Smither Park

Hole in the Wall competition results

Dan Phillips and the Phoenix Commotion in recent news...

The Phoenix Commotion is included in Natural Home & Garden's article on sustainable tile for the September/October 2001 issue. Click here to read the article.

Onis Stone partners with The Phoenix Commotion.

Dan speaks at Earth Day Texoma.

Smither Park in the Houston Chronicle.

Better Bones and Gardens short documenary film hits the film festival circuits.



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